Parish of Donoughmore, Co. Donegal
Memoir by Lieut. Wilkinson (received 18th April 1836)
NATURAL STATE
NAME AND LOCALITY
Donaghmore: this name is usually pronounced as it is written. The parish of Donaghmore is situated in the county of Donegal, in the barony of Raphoe and diocese of Derry. It is the most southerly parish in the barony and is bounded by the parishes of Donegal, Stranorlar, Convoy, Raphoe, Clonleigh and Urney in the county of Donegal and by the parishes of Skirts of Urney and Ardstraw <Ardstra> and Tennonamongan in the county of Tyrone.
Its greatest length from north east to south west is about 17 miles and its greatest breadth from south east to north west about 7 miles, comprising an area of about 46,055 acres 1 rood 26 perches of land and 335 acres 3 roods 6 perches of water. The outline is irregular.

NATURAL FEATURES
Hills The parish of Donaghmore comprehends portions of 3 distinct ranges of hills which are not in general distinguished by name from the townland in which they are situated. Those in the western extremity of the parish are a part of the Barnesmore range and extend from the Gap of B arnesmore to the valley of the Mournebeg river.
The principal points are the mountain forming the south side of the gap called Barnesmore Owen and rising to the height of 1,489 feet above the sea; Crosshill in the townland of Meenbog, which rises to 1,260 feet; and Brandy hill in the parish of Termonamongan near its boundary with Donaghmore (1,024 feet).
From the Mournebeg river a lower range occupies the extent of the parish in an easterly direction from that of the Mournebeg. The principal points are Trusk, in the townland of that name, 856 feet above the sea; Lissmullyduff, also called Droghert mountain, in the townland of Lissmullyduff, 867 feet; Croonalaghy, in the townland of that name, 767 feet; Mounthall, in the townland of the same name, 720 feet; and Rawshill, in the townland of Raws Upper.
The third and lowest range is in the north eastern part of the parish, to the north of the River Finn which it divides from the valley of the Burndale river. The principal points are Leaghthill, in the townland of that name, 398 feet above the sea, and Carnowen, in the townland of Carnowen, 400 feet.
Lakes

Lough Mourne, on the boundary of the parish of Donaghmore with the parish of Stranorlar (close to the south of the mail coach road from Londonderry to Sligo, at about 6 miles west of Ballybofey), is the largest lake. It contains about 174 acres, is nearly 556 feet above the level of the sea and about 48 feet deep. There is one very small island in the lough. The Mournebeg river rises in the lough and issues from its south west extremity.

Trusk lough, about 2 and a half miles to the south of Ballybofey, <Ballyboefay>, on the west of the road from Stranorlar by Aghyarran Lodge to Kil1eter, contains about 52 acres, is situated about 556 feet above the sea and is about 20 feet deep. The water from Trusk lough supplies the mills at Navenny.

Lough Carney is situate in the townland of Crohonagh about a quarter of a mile westward of Lough Mourne. It contains about 6 acres, is 554 feet above the sea and about 8 feet deep. It is surrounded by a marsh, from the drainings of which it appears formed. A stream flows from Lough Carney to join the Mournebeg river about 8 chains from its issue from Lough Mourne.

Lough Napaise is partly in the townland of Meenbog and situated on the boundary of the parishes of Donaghmore and Donegal. It is 1,050 feet above the sea, contains about 3 and a half acres and is about 10 feet deep. A mountain stream called the Swannagh river flows from Lough Napaise and, after an easterly course of about 3 and a half miles, joins the Mournebeg river.

Lough Namaskher is also partly in the townland of Meenbog and situated on the boundary of the parishes of Donegal and Donaghmore. It is 1,041 feet above the sea, contains about 8 and a half acres and is about 12 feet deep.
Louah Innaghaehole is also partly in the townland of Meenbog and is situated at the junction of the 3 parishes of Donaghmore, Donegal and Termonamongan. It is 1,111 feet above the sea, contains about 3 and a half acres and is about 8 feet deep. A stream flows from this lough towards the south east, between the parishes of Donaghmore and Termonamongan.
Lough Swannagh is situated in the townland of Meenbog about half a mile north of Lough Innaghachole. It is 1,044 feet above the sea, contains about 2 acres and is about 10 feet deep. A stream flows from this lake to the north east and joins the Sawanah river. The lake receives a stream from a blind lough or swamp about an eighth of a mile westward of it.

Lough Carrickaduff, situated in the townland of Meenbog near its south extremity: it is 999 feet above the sea, contains about 1 and a half acres and is about 9 feet deep.

Lough Gunick is a small lake situated in the townland of Kinleater about a mile to the south south east of Trusk lough. It is 660 feet above the sea, contains about 1 acre and is about 6 feet deep. A small stream flows from it into Trusk lough.

Lough Yeelignihin is situated at the junction of the townlands of Gortachork, Meenreagh and Meenahenisk. It is about 733 feet above the sea, contains about 1 acre and is about 8 feet deep. A stream flows from this lake forming the boundary between Gortachork and Meenahenisk.

Lough Beg is situated in the townland of Tieveclogher. It is 683 feet above the sea, contains about 2 acres and is about 6 feet deep. A small stream flows from this lake to join the Mournebeg river.

Lough Shinnagh is situated in the townland of Trusk about half a mile west south west of Trusk lough. It is 638 feet above the sea, contains about 5 acres and is about 13 feet deep. A stream from Lough Shinnagh flows naturally towards the south south east and joins the Mournebeg river, but a channel has been made near the lough by which this stream is divided and a branch made to flow into Trusk lough.

These lakes in general contain black trout, eels and perch, and salmon come up the Mournebeg river into Lough Mourne.

Rivers River Finn: this river is navigable to Castlefin for vessels carrying from 40 to 60 tons and for about a mile above Castlefin for pleasure boats drawing less than a foot of water. After this the shoals effectually impede the progress of even the smallest craft. Large floods rise in the Finn about 6 hours after falls of rain in the mountains.

The Mournebeg river rises in Lough Mourne and, after flowing for about 4 miles through the parish of Donaghmore, forms for about 5 miles its southern boundary with that of Termonamongan. It then traverses this latter parish for about 4 and a half miles and falls into the Derg river about 2 miles below Killeter bridge. The Mournebeg river is not navigable in any part of its course; the bed is rocky.

The Burndale river, which is for about [blank] miles the boundary between Raphoe and Donaghmore, is unnavigable, subject to floods and flows in a gravelly and rocky channel.

There is also the Sawanah river, a stream called Mary Breen's burn, which both join the Mournebeg river, and many other mountain streams and rivulets.

The parish is well supplied with springs, some of which are deeply tinged with bog iron.

The salmon fishery at Killygordon is the property of Ralph Mansfield Esquire, who holds his estate by a grant from the Crown given to his ancestors in the reign of James I. It is rented by Mr Connolly of Killygordon at the sum of 4 pounds 4s per annum.
Bogs The parish of Donaghmore is well supplied with turf from extensive bogs, principally situated in Meenbog, Tieveclogher etc. Timber occurs, but not in great plenty, in Tieveclogher bog, principally fir. The logs are sold from 2s 6d to 1 pound and used for axle-trees and roofs for building. A good deal is raised for fuel and makes an excellent fire.

Turf is cheap in comparison with the neighbouring parishes. It is usually sold at from 3d to 4d per barrel in Ballybofey and Killygordon. The bogs are grazed at seasons. Charcoal made from turf is generally used in the smiths' forges.

MODERN TOPOGRAPHY

COMMUNICATIONS
Roads The mail coach road from Londonderry to Sligo passes through the parish for about 8 miles and the crossroads from Castlefin and Killygordon to Castlederg and Killeter on the road to Enniskillen. These roads are all made and repaired at the expense of the county by grand jury presentments and are often very much out of repair. Great want of skill or of superintendence appears in their construction, though good materials are at hand and in abundance.
Bridges

Castlefin bridge, at the entrance of that town from Castlederg, is a structure of 6 water arches and 6 land ones; the depth of the water near the bridge is generally about 5 feet and the fall not more than 2 feet. It was built by a Mr Mason and cost about 900 pounds, raised by assessment from the county, and was built at so little cost on account of the stones being procured from the ruins of a castle which stood close to the place. A large corn store and quay for loading and unloading boats have been built at the bridge by Dr Rogan of Londonderry, who is the principal proprietor of Castlefin. 4 boats are usually employed.

Liscooley bridge crosses the Finn on the road from Raphoe to Killeter through the townland of Liscooley. It was built in the year 1801 at the expense of about 1,100 pounds, raised by grand jury assessment. It has 5 water arches and 2 land ones to increase the waterway in time of floods. The fall of water at this bridge is about 3 feet.

Killygordon bridge crosses the Finn on the road from Kiliygordon to Killeter. It was built in the year 1782 and cost about 1,120 pounds, raised by assessment from the county. The fall of water through the bridge is about 4 feet. There are 7 arches. The depth of the ford at this bridge is usually about 3 feet.

The general depth of the Finn river from Stranorlar to Castlefin is about 6 feet, but it is navigable very little way above Castlefin on account of the fords and also of weirs to convey water to the corn and flax mills on its banks.


SOCIAL ECONOMY

Local Government Petty sessions are held at Stranorlar every fortnight on Wednesdays. The magistrates who usually attend are James Johnston Esquire of Woodlands, Captain Mansfield of Killygordon, Samuel Delap Esquire of Monellan, John Corcoran Esquire of Edenmore; and also Sir Edmund Hayes Bart, M.P. and Sir Charles Style Bart attend when resident.
Dispensary

The Donaghmore dispensary is established at Killygordon and supported by a grant from the grand jury of the county equal to the amount raised by private subscription. The medical attendant is Dr Babbington and his salary 70 pounds per annum. The days of attendance at the dispensary are Wednesdays and Saturdays from 10 o'clock a.m. till 2 o'clock p.m. About 1,400 persons are annually relieved.

Religion According to the government census taken in 1834, thepopulation of the parish of Donaghmore was, distinguishing each religious persuasion, as follows: 1,677 members of the Established Church, 8,234 Roman Catholics, 3,346 Presbyterians, total 13,257; and by enquiry made in 1835, vide statistical table, it would appear that there were in the parish 2,360 families which, on an average of 5 and a half to each, gives a population of 12,980 persons.

PRODUCTIVE ECONOMY

Fairs and Markets A weekly market is held in Castlefin on Saturdays and in Ballybofey on Thursdays, by which the farmers of the parish of Donaghmore obtain a ready sale for their produce such as butter, grain, flax, as the Londonderry merchants send agents to these places every market day to make purchases on commission.

Annual fairs are held at Castlefin on the Monday before Christmas Day (old style), on the Monday before Candlemas Day (old style), 17th March, Easter Monday, Whit Monday, 28th June, Monday before Lammas (old style), Monday before Michaelmas (old style) and on the 22nd November.

Annual fairs are held at Ballybofey on the last Thursdays in January, February and March. A fair is also held on the last Thursday in April, should it arrive before Easter Sunday, on the 22nd May and the 22nd December.

Annual fairs are held at Stranorlar on the 29th March, 12th August, 12th October and 13th December. These fairs are principally for the sale of cattle, pigs, sheep etc. They are not good horse fairs. Linen yarn etc. are also sold.
Farms and Rents

The size of farms in the lowlands vary from 12 to 40 acres. They are usually held by lease from the head landlord either in perpetuity or for 31 years and 3 lives. The best land in the lowlands is let at 2 pounds per acre, the middling 1 pound 5s and the worst quality at about 15s. The rents are paid wholly in money. The farmers in general farm for subsistence. The tenants are liable to tithe and county cess.

The farm buildings are not in general good and commodious. They are usually erected and kept in repair by the tenants. In the mountains the farms vary from 50 to 500 acres and the arable part of them produces chiefly oats and potatoes. A farm in Tieveclogher of about 500 acres is let on lease of 31 years at 30 pounds per annum.

Crops and Grazing The lowlands produce potatoes, oats, barley, flax and wheat in considerable quantity about Castlefin. The mountains are used for cattle grazing, which are sent to them from the lowlands. Very few sheep are fed on the hills as they are considered too cold for sheep-walks. The rotation of crops is as follows: potatoes, flax or oats (in the former case the land is again set with potatoes), wheat or barley and potatoes again. The lands in the valley of Finn are rich and productive. Cultivation is carried up the mountain to the height of [blank] above the sea.
Manures The manures used are usually lime, which is abundant, compost and farmyard manure. Every cottage has a receptacle as close to it as possible (generally indeed so close that the wall of the house has the manure heaped up against it) which receives the drainage and refuse of the house. In this receptacle the manure is made, the foundation of it being a quantity of earth drawn from the fields, road scrapings etc. If the inhabitants of the cottage be rich enough to keep a cow, the manure benefits by the addition of some animal matter.

In very many instances, however, the person is so poor as not to be able to keep horse or cow. In these cases it is clear that the clay drawn in is not better when it is restored to the field, than insomuch as it may have improved by turning, exposure to sun, rain and frost, and the very small quantity of manure which may be contained in the drainage from the house (the people themselves call this souring).

It is not to be wondered at that with such a system as this the lands are deteriorated, the crops except in very favourable seasons scanty and the face of the country (cultivated lands) covered with weeds. Another serious evil attending this system is that such collections of filth at the door of every habitation must inevitably have the effect of creating disease and spreading infection.

MODERN TOPOGRAPHY

Gentlemen's Seats On the river, about half a mile above Castlefmn, the Glebe House of Donaghmore is situated. The house is a remarkably good one and the grounds are very tastefully laid out, and by former rectors have been much improved by plantations and enclosures. Some of the finest old trees that I have seen in this district were growing on the mensal lands. The present rector Revd Charles Irvine, has, in the last 3 years, quite denuded the place by unsparingly cutting down every tree of any growth.
Following the mail coach road, and to the south of it about 3 miles farther towards Stranorlar, are the houses and demesnes of Mount Hall, [blank] Young Esquire; Monellan, Samuel Delap Esquire; adjoining Killygordon is Killygordon demesne, the residence of Captain Mansfield; and from hence, proceeding towards Stranorlar on the road to the south of the River Finn, are Woodlands, Edenmore, John Corcoran Esquire; and Summerhill, the residence of James Johnston Esquire, an extensive linen bleacher.

In all these places are young plantations of some extent and the residence of these gentlemen at their several country houses is of much benefit to their immediate tenants and neighbours.

PUBLIC BUILDINGS
Church The church is a plain but neat building of modem date, having no tower, and is calculated to hold about 300 persons. About it were many fine old trees which have not escaped the axe. The church has just been newly roofed and slated by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners.
There is a chapel of ease at the crossroads above Killygordon which has been lately erected by the Board of First Fruits. It is a neat plain building without a tower and will contain 400 persons. The churchyard has been very tastefully laid out and planted by the curate Revd Robert Delap.
Catholic Chapels

There are 3 Roman Catholic chapels and 3 meeting houses in the usual style, plain barn-roofed buildings. The Roman Catholic chapel at Castlefin was built in 1822 by the congregation at an expense of about 250 pounds and calculated to hold about 350 persons.

There was also a schoolhouse built on part of the ground belonging to the chapel, but no school is taught there at present owing to the death of the person appointed to teach in it and to his widow keeping possession of the premises, contrary to the wish of the congregation.

The chapel yard is used as a burial ground. It is held by lease granted by the late Mrs Fox at the yearly rent of 2 pounds 14s.

The Roman Catholic chapel in the townland of Ballinacor was built in 1790 at an expense of about 800 pounds, by subscription from the congregation. It will hold about 900 persons.

The Roman Catholic chapel in the townland of Sessiaghoneill has been lately built by the congregation, assisted by public subscription. It cost about 500 pounds and is calculated to contain about 800 persons.

Meeting Houses There is a small Presbyterian meeting house in the townland of Lower Raws. It was built at the expense of the congregation and cost about 300 pounds. The minister receives a regium donum of 75 pounds per annum and 25 pounds from his hearers.
The Seceders' meeting house in the townland of Carnone was built in the year 1768 by the congregation at an expense of about 250 pounds. It will hold about 400 persons. The Revd William Dicky is the minister. His salary is about 54 pounds per annum. People are said to attend this meeting house from the parishes of Clonleigh, Urney, Donaghmore, Convoy and Raphoe.
The Presbyterian meeting house in the townland of Carrickashane was built in the year 1771 at the expense of the congregation and cost about 500 pounds. It will hold about 700 persons. The minister is the Revd Richard Dill.

TOWNS

Castlefin Castlefin, owing to its being situated at the commencement of the navigation of the river, and the energy and enterprise of the proprietor Dr Francis Rogan of Derry, is likely to rise into importance. Already a corn market has been established and the quantity of grain shipped during the season for the Derry merchants is very considerable.
When a contemplated new line of road by Derg to Enniskillen shall have been completed much, indeed all, of the produce of the interior of Fermanagh which now finds its way to Derry via Strabane will be shipped at Castlefin, the freight being considerably under what the bargemen, who ply from Strabane to Derry, can carry for, in consequence of the tolls of their canal.

There is a market house here built about 230 years, and the number of inhabitants amount to about 700. As usual the proportion of houses licensed to retail whiskey is very great as compared to shops of all other descriptions in the town. There is a weekly market on Mondays, a post office, and the mail to and from Londonderry and Sligo passes daily through the town.
Houses in Castlefin

The houses in Castlefin adjoining the market house are 2-storeys high, slated and many of them newly built. Those in the outskirts are in general merely thatched cottages. There is a mansion house adjoining Castlefin which was part of the estate and the residence of the late Mrs Fox. It is unoccupied at present. A man named Scott, employed as a spy by King William's army, was taken by King James and hanged over the southern arch of the market house (1688). It was roofed about 20 years since.

Killygordon Killygordon consists principally of a street or row of houses on the mail coach road from Londonderry to Sligo. There is a post office and daily post, dispensary and tanyard. The houses in general are low thatched cottages. There are a few 2-storeys high and slated. Killygordon demesne, the residence of Captain Mansfield, a magistrate, adjoins the village.
No markets are held but there are 5 annual fairs, on the 31st May, 31st August, 28th September, 1 st December and 3rd March, principally for the sale of cattle, sheep, pigs.
Manufactories Weaving linen and spinning yarn forms the winter occupations of the peasantry. There are bleach greens of some extent at Navenny and Dreenan, the property of James Johnston Esquire, at which are annually bleached 20,000 to 14,000 pieces of linen and 60 men are constantly employed. Their wages are from 4s 7d ha'penny to 15s a week each and there are besides other men employed to raise and cut turf in the mountain. Mr Johnston states that the fuel for the green cost 200 pounds per annum, notwithstanding the convenience of bog. The linen is generally seveneighths yard width, of a strong and useful description.

The water which supplies the mills is bound to them by the proprietor of the soil, Marquis Conyngham, and Mr Johnston can prevent any persons erecting mills on the water between its source at Trusk lough and the green.

Permission was granted to Mr Walker to build a corn mill on certain conditions, and he would also have built a tanyard but this was considered by Mr Johnston injurious to the water and its erection forbidden.

There is no peculiar arrangement at these greens: The wheels are all breast shot, from 12 to 14 feet in diameter and from 3 to 4 and a half in breadth. The cloth when bleached is sent to Dublin and Liverpool.

SOCIAL AND PRODUCTIVE ECONOMY

Advowson The living of Donaghmore is of considerable value, about 2,000 pounds per annum. The former incumbent, the Revd Sir John Lighton Bart, sold the perpetual advowson of it to Captain John Irving of Dublin, who presented his son the Revd Charles Irving, the present rector, to the parish.

The board of Trinity College of Dublin were in treaty with Sir John Lighton for the purchase of this living but afterwards declined it. They have been since desirous of obtaining it from the present proprietor.

A family of the name of Spence were originally in possession of the advowson and still make some claim to it. Though not in the gift, it is under the episcopal jurisdiction of the Bishop of Derry. The rector of Donaghmore has the appointment of the curate to the chapel of ease, subject to the approval of his nominee by the Bishop of Derry.

The tithes were valued under the Tithe Composition Act at 1,440 pounds per annum, the glebes, which include the townlands of Upper Alt and Calhame in the parish of Urney, at 740 pounds, total 2,180 pounds, subject to the charges made by recent acts of parliament.
Obstacles to Improvement

The great and leading impediment in the way of improvement here, as elsewhere, strikes me to be the absence of the natural guardians and protectors of the people, viz. their landlords. There are some exceptions, highly creditable to the individuals, in which the contrary conduct on the part of proprietors of estates proves clearly that were the solitary examples of kind, considerate and resident landlords universally adopted, very rapid and lasting benefits would result to the people and country.

Improving Landlords I can point out no better exemplification of this than is afforded by a property belonging to Sir Robert Ferguson Bart in this parish, on the left bank of the Finn proceeding upwards and about 1 mile from Castlefin. The farmhouses here are of a thriving [nature] and in comfort, and altogether there is an absence of that squalid wretchedness that meets you but too generally in the dwellings of the lower orders.

This is entirely attributable to the personal investigation by the landlord into the circumstances of his tenantry and the entrusting the management of his property in his absence to the superintendence of a humane and intelligent agent, who sees the enlightened and benevolent views of his employer carried into effect.

The same history is to be told of improvement wherever Sir Robert's property is to be found and, while it confers comfort and happiness on his people, he finds his account in the augmented value of his estates and the punctual payment of his rents.
I have already alluded to the activity and enterprise of the proprietor of Castlefin (Dr Francis Rogan), by whose exertions the navigation of the river has been opened and the trade of the town created.
Plantations Sir Robert Ferguson has made some judicious plantations on his estate which are thriving and luxuriant. The ground occupied by them was formerly of little or no value. The trees are of about 12 or 15 years' growth. The thinnings of these plantations he makes use of, chiefly in roofing and repairing his tenants' houses.

ANCIENT TOPOGRAPHY

Castle A castle, belonging to the O'Donnell family, is said to have stood at Castlefin, commanding the ford at which the present bridge is built. No trace of the castle remains, the stones having been used in the construction of the bridge. In the reign of James I the castle and estate of Castlefmn are said to have been confiscated and granted to a General Kingsmill, for his conduct in suppressing the rebel O'Donnell. General Kingsmill having no male heir, the estate was divided among his 4 daughters and has descended by marriage to its present possessors.

The site of another castle belonging to the O'Donnells is still shown in the townland of Killygordon, near the left bank of the River Finn at a place called Lower farm. In the reign of James I, Manus O'Donnell (brother to Earl O'Donnell of Donegal), who then held this castle being in the rebellion, an English force was sent against him and in a few days he and his adherents dispersed. An English officer named Mansfield having greatly distinguished himself on this occasion, the king granted the castle and estate called the estate of Killygordon to him and his heirs, by whom it is still possessed.
Holy Wells There is a well in the townland of Carrick, close to the roadside from Castlefin to Killygordon, which is called a holy well. Roman Catholics still resort to it to perform ceremonies and receive benefit for sore eyes, pains. The spring was discovered about 30 years since by a man digging a French drain and, finding the spring remarkably strong, the drain was sunk deeper than usual and a bell discovered with a Latin inscription on it. The parish priest, named McBride, hearing of the discovery, asked to see this bell and, having read the inscription, would not return it to the finder but sent it to Rome; and from the date of its arrival there the well has been believed and affirmed to be "a well of cures."

There is another holy well in the townland of Killtown to which the Roman Catholics still go to obtain relief for sore eyes etc. by making what is called a station.
Curious Stones In the wall of the parish church of Donaghmore is a stone with the figure of a greyhound on it. The tradition: that it is the representation of a favourite greyhound bitch belonging to a giant named Ossian, whom St Patrick was anxious to convert to Christianity and at whose request it was engraved on a stone placed beside the altar. In the old church about 70 years since, during the incumbency of the Revd Mr Spence, the church was rebuilt on a larger scale and, in pulling down the former one, this stone was broken but replaced in the wall, where it still remains.

The Roman Catholics claim a portion of the burial ground attached to the church and bury there. On the mearing between Garvagh in the county of Tyrone and Coradooey in the county of Donegal there are a number of stones standing upright and called the County Cairn. It is said to be the grave of a favourite greyhound belonging to a giant named Derby which died at this place.
Grave and Traditions On the mearing between Mounthall and Coradooey is a place called the Boys Grave. A pedlar is said to have been murdered and buried here, and the occupier of this part of the mountain asserts that his uncle, who is now dead, often saw at night the appearance of a man hovering about the spot; and as he was never, by any exertions, able to approach it, the people suppose that it was the spirit of the pedlar.

The hill where the trigonometrical station (called Lismullyduff in the townland of that name) is placed is supposed by the inhabitants to be a haunt of the fairies, and the sound of musical instruments and merriment often heard there.
Giant's Grave The townland of Trusk and the iough are said to have been named after a giant whose grave is shown on the western side of the lough. Under the surface of the bog near this place are found large stones laid at intervals like stepping [stones] in the ford of a river.
Mysterious Animal A man named Byrne, who lives in a part of Trusk called Repentance, relates that there is in the lough a kind of amphibious animal as large as a young heifer. He has often seen its head above water and one summer's evening, as he and a boy were making hay by moonlight, he saw it coming from the IouQh towards them and ran home terrified.
The next evening his son, mowing grass beside the lough, saw it swim on shore to a dyke. He crept to the place in order to strike at it with his scythe, but its appearance affrightened him and he dared not venture. On seeing him, the animal plunged into the lake and has not since appeared; but when the lough is frozen, wild and tremendous howling is heard beneath the ice, which these people suppose to be the "dorhagh," as they call it.
Berwick Hall and Giant's Bed Berwick Hall near Liscooley bridge is so named from Duke of Berwick's having rested there.
There is also a place called the Giant's Bed near the eastern extremity of Lough Mourne, in the townland of Crohonagh. No tradition exists respecting it.
Altar There is a place in the townland of Meenagolan near the River Mourne called theAltar, which was used as such by a Roman Catholic priest named Dougherty who, about 60 years since, was parish priest of Tennonamongan.
Carrickmagra The townland of Carrickmagra is said to take its name from a giant called Magrath, who was killed on a rock situated in it which is still called Laught Ard or, in English, "the high monument:"
Danish Forts Throughout the parish of Donaghmore are many of the circular enclosures called Danish forts, presenting nothing unusual.
There is a tradition attached to one near the River Finn in the townland of Ballyarrell which relates that a church was once going to be built on the spot, but the structure was repeatedly thrown down by something in the shape of a goat that came out of the river.
Discoveries in Bogs In the townland of Corgary a brass pot or cauldron was found under the bog in cutting peat. It is in the possession of Manus Byrne, pensioner from the 1 st Regiment of Foot, and is used as a cooking utensil. There is no inscription on it.
A cake of tallow weighing about 51bs and several old iron implements resembling knives or razors were also found near the spot, at a considerable depth in the bog.

PRODUCTIVE ECONOMY
CASTLEFIN
Trades Return of the trades etc. in the town of Castlefin. Table contains the following headings: trade or calling, number of employers, journeymen and apprentices, total number.
  • Shoemakers: 5 employers, 8 journeymen and apprentices, total 13.
  • Tailors: 4 employers, 8 journeymen and apprentices, total 12.
  • Painters: 3 employers, total 3.
  • Blacksmiths: 2 employers, 3 journeymen and apprentices, total 5.
  • Wheelwrights: 4 employers, total 4. Weavers: 1 employer, total 1.
  • Carpenters: 3 employers, 3 journeymen and apprentices, total 6.
  • Bakers: 4 employers, 1 journeyman and apprentice, total 5.
  • Grocers: total 6. Publicans: total 13.
  • Land surveyors: [blank].
  • Protestant clergymen: total 2.
  • Stonemasons: 4 employers, total 4.
  • Land agents: [blank].
  • Nailers: 1 employer, total 1.
  • Broguemakers: 3 employers, total 3.
  • Reedmakers: 2 employers, total 2.
  • Farmers: 4 employers, total 4.
  • Butchers: 2 employers, total 2.
  • Coopers: 2 employers, total 2.
  • Apothecaries: 1 employer, total 1.


KILLYGORDON
Trades Return of the trades etc. in the town of Killygordon.
  • Public houses: 1
  • Public houses and grocer's shops: 3
  • Grocer's shops: 1
  • Bakers: 1
  • Blacksmith's forges: 2
  • Blacksmiths: 4
  • Carpenters: 5
  • Shoemakers: 4
  • Tailors: 6
  • Weavers: 12
  • Butchers: 4
  • Tanners: 4
  • Nailers: 2
  • Post office: 1
  • Dispensary: 1
  • Doctors: 1
  • Cloth shop: 1


SOCIAL ECONOMY
CENSUS AND ENQUIRY IN 1831
Statistical table of the parish of Donaghmore, as taken from census and enquiry made in 1831. Table contains the following headings name of townland, analysis of types of buildings and families, county cess [blank], name of landlord.
Allison Sessagh 12 inhabited buildings, 25 dwelling houses and families, 6 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 19 total buildings; landlord Colonel Delap <Delop>.
Ardnagannagh 6 inhabited buildings, 9 dwelling houses and. families, 9 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 2 in ruins, 18 total buildings; landlord Revd Mr Hamilton.
Aviltygort 13 inhabited buildings, 16 dwelling houses and families, 11 outhouses, 3 in ruins, 27 total buildings; landlord late Dr Gillespey.
Bahanbwee 16 inhabited buildings, 19 dwelling houses and families, 14 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 5 in ruins, 36 total buildings; landlord Sir Alexander Stewart of Ards.
Ballybun 35 inhabited buildings, 47 dwelling houses, 15 outhouses, 5 in ruins, 55 total buildings; landlord Mr Leckey.
Ballygunnigan 13 inhabited buildings, 20 dwelling houses and families, 9 outhouses, 2 in ruins, 24 total buildings; landlord Robert Ferguson Bart.
Ballynaman 11 inhabited buildings, 16 dwelling houses and families, 9 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 21 total buildings; landlord Mr McConkey.
Ballinacor 48 inhabited buildings, 77 dwelling houses and families, 43 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 8 in ruins, 100 total buildings; landlords James Johnston Esquire, Mrs Scott and Miss Harvey.
Ballyarrell 31 inhabited buildings. 44 dwelling houses and families, 19 outhouses, 6 in ruins, 56 total buildings; landlord Messrs Davidson and Beatty.
Bealalt 21 inhabited buildings, 30 dwelling houses and families, 22 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 3 in ruins, 47 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Ferguson.
Blairstown 16 inhabited buildings, 30 dwelling houses and families, 10 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 3 in ruins, 31 total buildings; landlord Counsellor Walker.
Breaghy 3 inhabited buildings, 5 dwelling houses and families, 7 outhouses, 10 total buildings; landlord Colonel Delap.
Calhame 23 inhabited buildings, 25 dwelling houses and families, 8 outhouses, 5 in ruins, 36 total buildings; landlord Sir Alexander Stewart.
Carnowen 77 inhabited buildings, 82 dwelling houses and families, 67 outhouses, 3 uninhabited houses, 15 in ruins, 162 total buildings; landlord Robert Ferguson.
Carrick 24 inhabited buildings, 34 dwelling houses and families, 21 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 3 in ruins, 49 total buildings; landlord Counsellor Walker.
Carrickashane 12 inhabited buildings, 13 dwelling houses and families, 15 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 1 in ruins, 29 total buildings; landlord Counsellor Walker.
Carnadore 7 inhabited buildings, 9 dwelling houses and families, 5 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 14 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Ferguson.
Carrickshandrum 13 inhabited buildings, 20 dwelling houses and families, 5 outhouses, 1 in ruins, 19 total buildings; landlord Mr Montgomery.
Carrans 41 inhabited buildings, 45 dwelling houses and families, 16 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, l0 in ruins, 68 total buildings; landlord Mr Montgomery.
Carrickmagra 55 inhabited buildings, 73 dwelling houses and families, 28 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 3 in ruins, 87 total buildings; landlord Lord Lifford.
Carricknamanna 36 inhabited buildings, 41 dwelling houses and families, 44 outhouses, 8 uninhabited houses, 6 in ruins, 94 total buildings; landlord Sir Alexander Stewart.
Castlefin 41 inhabited buildings, 109 dwelling houses and families, 45 outhouses, 10 inhabited houses, 11 in ruins, 107 total buildings; landlords Dr Rogan and Captain Fox.
Cashellin 11 inhabited buildings, 13 dwelling houses and families, 8 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 2 in ruins, 23 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Ferguson.
Cavan Upper 25 inhabited buildings, 28 dwelling houses and families, 25 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 2 in ruins, 54 total buildings; landlord Mr Hone.
Cavan Lower 40 inhabited buildings, 43 dwelling houses and families, 36 outhouses, 3 uninhabited houses, 9 in ruins, 88 total buildings; landlord Mr Hone.
Cloonarreli 19 inhabited buildings, 27 dwelling houses and families, 13 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 1 ruin, 34 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Ferguson.
Cloughard 5 inhabited buildings, 7 dwelling houses and families, 2 outhouses, 3 in ruins, 10 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Ferguson.
Cooladawson 12 inhabited buildings, 15 dwelling houses and families, 6 outhouses, 1 in ruins, 19 total buildings; landlord Mr Stewart.
Corcaum 5 inhabited buildings, 6 dwelling houses and families, 3 outhouses, 1 in ruins, 9 total buildings; landlord Mr Stewart.
Cornabroag 6 inhabited buildings, 7 dwelling houses and families, 3 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 11 total buildings; landlord Rector Hamilton.
Correfrin 23 inhabited buildings, 34 dwelling houses and families, 2 outhouses, 5 in ruins, 30 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Beatson.
Corlea 8 inhabited buildings, 9 dwelling houses and families, 7 outhouses, 3 in ruins, 18 total buildings; landlord Mr John Craig.
Coradooey 9 inhabited buildings, 11 dwelling houses and families, 9 outhouses, 1 in ruins, 19 total buildings; landlord MrYoung.
Corgary 19 inhabited buildings, 24 dwelling houses and families, 10 outhouses, 3 in ruins, 32 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Beatson.
Croonalaghy 19 inhabited buildings, 28 dwelling houses and families, 17 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 8 in ruins, 46 total buildings; landlord Dr Darby.
Crohonagh 6 inhabited buildings, 7 dwelling houses and families, 3 outhouses, 3 in ruins, 12 total buildings; landlord Lord Lifford.
Curcullian 9 inhabited buildings, 12 dwelling houses and families, 1 outhouse, 10 total buildings; landlord Lady Galbraith.
Demesne 6 inhabited buildings, 8 dwelling houses and families, 6 outhouses, 12 total buildings; landlord John Finton Esquire.
Donaghmore Glebe 8 inhabited buildings, 9 dwelling houses and families, 11 outhouses, 2 in ruins, 21 total buildings; landlord Rector Irving.
Dooghan 8 inhabited buildings, 12 dwelling houses and families, 2 outhouses, 2 in ruins, 12 total buildings; landlord Colonel Delap.
Dreenan 25 inhabited buildings, 42 dwelling houses and families, 9 outhouses, 7 uninhabited houses, 4 in ruins, 45 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Beatson.
Drimfergus 9 inhabited buildings, l l dwelling houses and families, 6 outhouses, 1 in ruins, 16 total buildings; landlord Mr Delap.
Drimkennian 9 inhabited buildings, 10 uninhabited buildings, 5 outhouses, 1 in ruins, 15 total buildings; landlord Mr Delap.
Dromore 23 inhabited buildings, 35 dwelling houses and families, 15 outhouses, 3 uninhabited houses, 4 in ruins, 45 total buildings; landlord Mr Young.
Drummurphy 16 inhabited houses, 18 dwelling houses and families, 17 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 2 in ruins, 36 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Ferguson.
Drumeavish 19 inhabited buildings, 25 dwelling houses and families, 12 outhouses, 3 in ruins, 34 total buildings; landlord James Johnstorr.
Dungorman 15 inhabited buildings, 17 dwelling houses and families, 12 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 3 in ruins, 31 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Ferguson.
Edenmore 12 inhabited buildings, 13 dwelling houses and families, 14 outhouses, l ruin, 27 total buildings; landlord Mr Cockran.
Edenohill 8 inhabited buildings, 12 dwelling houses and families, 9 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 4 in ruins, 22 total buildings; landlord Mr Delap.
Egglybaan 6 inhabited buildings, 6 dwelling houses and families, 3 outhouses, 9 total buildings; landlord Mr William Causeland.
Garrison Hill 9 inhabited buildings, 11 dwelling houses and families, 5 outhouses, 2 in ruins, 16 total buildings; landlord widow of the late Counsellor Scott.
Gleneely 25 inhabited buildings, 38 dwelling houses and families, 17 outhouses, 2 in ruins, 44 total buildings; landlord Rector Hamilton.
Glencovit 10 inhabited buildings, 11 dwelling houses and families, 7 outhouses, 4 in ruins, 21 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Beatson.
Goland 39 inhabited buildings, 59 dwelling houses and families, 19 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 8 in ruins, 67 total buildings; landlord Lord Lifford.
Gortachork 14 inhabited buildings, 21 dwelling house and families, 7 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 2 in ruins, 24 total buildings; landlords Messrs McConkey and Doherty.
Gortfad 8 inhabited buildings, 14 dwelling houses and families, 11 outhouses, 4 in ruins, 23 total buildings; landlord Revd Mr Colthurst.
Gortnamuck 36 inhabited buildings, 48 dwelling houses and families, 13 outhouses, 1 in ruins, 50 total buildings; landlord Conolly Gage Esquire.
Grahamsland 24 inhabited buildings, 42 dwelling houses and families, 5 outhouses, 3 in ruins, 32 total buildings; landlord Colonel Delap.
Killygordon 52 inhabited buildings, 76 dwelling houses and families, 54 outhouses, 3 uninhabited houses, 1 in ruins, 110 total buildings; landlords Messrs Mansfield.
Killtown 8 inhabited buildings, 8 dwelling houses and families, 8 outhouses, 2 in ruins, 18 total buildings; landlord Counsellor Walker.
Kilcadden 9 inhabited buildings, 13 dwelling houses and families, 12 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 1 in ruins, 24 total buildings; landlord Mr William Walker.
Kinleater landlord Marquis of Conyngham <Cunningham>.
Knock 19 inhabited buildings, 23 dwelling houses and families, 12 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 33 total buildings; landlord Marquis Conyngham.
Knockrawer 4 inhabited buildings, 4 dwelling houses and families, 3 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 9 total buildings; landlord Marquis Conyngham.
Leaght 37 inhabited buildings, 53 dwelling houses and families, 21 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 10 in ruins, 69 total buildings; landlord Mr Young.
Lisnabert 3 inhabited buildings, 3 dwelling houses and families, 4 outhouses, 7 total buildings; landlord Colonel Delap.
Liscooley 7 inhabited buildings, 7 dwelling houses and families, 6 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 3 in ruins, 18 total buildings; landlord Counsellor Walker.
Lisnamulligan 17 inhabited buildings, 25 dwelling houses and families, 9 outhouses, 7 in ruins, 33 total buildings; landlords Sir Robert Ferguson and Mr Chambers.
Lissmullyduff 26 inhabited buildings, 37 dwelling houses and families, 29 outhouses, 4 in ruins, 59 total buildings; landlord Samuel Delap Esquire.
Longsessagh 14 inhabited buildings, 18 dwelling houses and families, 9 outhouses, 4 in ruins, 27 total buildings; landlord Colonel Delap.
Magherareagh 6 inhabited buildings, 6 dwelling houses and families, 12 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 19 total buildings; landlord Lady Galbraith.
Magherashanvalley l inhabited buildings, 13 dwelling houses and families, 4 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 2 in ruins, 18 total dwellings landlord Colonel Delap.
Magherybwee 14 inhabited buildings, 15 dwelling houses and families, 16 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 2 in ruins, 33 total buildings; landlord Counsellor Walker.
Meenreagh 19 inhabited buildings, 24 dwelling houses and families, 20 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 4 in ruins, 45 total buildings; landlords Messrs Disney.
Meenlaugher 18 inhabited buildings, 28 dwelling houses and families, 19 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 1 in ruins, 40 total dwellings; landlord Sir Robert Ferguson.
Meenbog 11 inhabited buildings, 12 dwelling houses and families, 3 outhouses, 4 in ruins, 18 total buildings; landlord Lord Lifford.
Meenahoney 9 inhabited buildings, 12 dwelling houses and families, 8 outhouses, 2 in ruins, 19 total dwellings; landlord Counsellor Walker.
Meenagolan 7 inhabited buildings, 7 dwelling houses and families, 5 outhouses, 5 in ruins, 17 total buildings landlord Mr Delap.
Meenahenisk 15 inhabited buildings, 24 dwelling houses and families, 11 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 3 in ruins, 30 total buildings; landlord Miss Harvey.
Monellan 24 inhabited buildings, 30 dwelling houses and families, 19 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 2 in ruins, 47 total buildings; landlord Mr Delap.
Mountain Park 5 inhabited buildings, 7 dwelling houses and families, 4 outhouses, l ruin, 10 total dwellings; landlord Miss Harvey.
Mounthall 22 inhabited buildings, 32 dwelling houses and families, 15 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 6 in ruins, 45 total buildings; landlords Messrs Delap and Young.
Mullanbwee 5 inhabited buildings, 6 dwelling houses and families, 8 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 15 total buildings; landlords Messrs Lecky and Finton.
Mullaghanairy 16 inhabited buildings, 26 dwelling houses and families, 9 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 6 in ruins, 32 total buildings; landlord Mr McConkey.
Mullingar 5 inhabited buildings, 6 dwelling houses and families, 4 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 1 in ruins, 11 total buildings; landlord Sir Alexander Stewart.
Navenny 27 inhabited buildings, 35 dwelling houses and families, 28 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 5 in ruins, 61 total buildings; landlord Marquis Conyngham.
Owenagaderagh 5 inhabited buildings, 9 dwelling houses and families, 5 outhouses, 10 total buildings; landlord Mr Delap.
Raws Lower 14 inhabited buildings, 19 dwelling houses and families, 5 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 2 in ruins, 22 total buildings; landlord Connolly Gage Esquire.
Raws Upper 21 inhabited buildings, 29 dwelling houses and families, 11 outhouses, 2 in ruins, 34 total buildings; landlord Mr McCausland.
Rushyhill 13 inhabited buildings, 22 dwelling houses and families, 9 outhouses, 3 in ruins, 25 total buildings; landlord Messrs Derby.
Sallywood 12 inhabited buildings, 12 dwelling houses and families, 2 outhouses, 4 in ruins, 18 total buildings; landlord James Johnston.
Sessagh O'Neill 18 inhabited buildings, 23 dwelling houses and families, 6 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 5 in ruins, 30 total buildings; landlord Marquis Conyngham.
Sessaghmore 3 inhabited buildings, 4 dwelling houses and families, 3 outhouses, 6 total buildings; landlord Colonel Delap.
Scotland 1 inhabited building, 1 dwelling house and family, 2 outhouses, 3 total buildings; landlord Counsellor Walker.
Stranamuck 4 inhabited buildings, 6 dwelling houses and families, 5 outhouses, 2 in ruins, 11 total buildings; landlord Lady Galbraith.
Tamnacrum 10 inhabited buildings, 13 dwelling houses and families, 8 outhouses, 1 in ruins, 19 total buildings; landlord Miss Harvey.
Taughbuoy 15 inhabited buildings, 18 dwelling houses and families, 2 outhouses, 2 in ruins, 19 total buildings; landlord Lord Lifford.
Tievebrack 31 inhabited buildings, 44 dwelling houses and families, 12 outhouses, 1 in ruins, 44 total buildings; landlord Mrs Stanhope.
Tieranisk 9 inhabited buildings, 13 dwelling houses and families, 7 outhouses, 2 uninhabited houses, 6 in ruins, 24 total buildings; landlord Mr Lecky.
Tieveclogher 16 inhabited buildings, 20 dwelling houses and families, 15 outhouses, 1 in ruins, 32 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Beatson
Tiernagushog or Bickelstown 8 inhabited buildings, 10 dwelling houses and families, 5 outhouses, 4 in ruins, 17 total buildings; landlord Sir Robert Ferguson.
Trusk 28 inhabited buildings, 38 dwelling houses and families, 14 outhouses, 1 uninhabited house, 7 in ruins, 50 total buildings; landlord Marquis Conyngham.
Whitehill 5 inhabited buildings, 7 dwelling houses and families, 1 outhouse, 2 in ruins, 8 total buildings; landlord Sir Alexander Stewart.

TABLE OF SCHOOLS
Table contains the following headings situation, number of pupils subdivided by religion and sex, remarks as to how supported.
Ballyarrell
  • 4 Protestant males
  • 4 Protestant females
  • 9 Presbyterian males
  • 10 Presbyterians females
  • 11 Roman Catholic males
  • 3 Roman Catholic females
Total: 41

The teacher's name is Steven Maxwell, a Presbyterian. He estimates this school to be worth on the average 12 pounds per annum, which he receives from the scholars; he has nothing else to depend on.
Craig McLouglin, in the townland of Gortachork 42 Roman Catholic males, 24 Roman Catholic females Total: 66 The teacher's name is Peter Murdock, a Roman Catholic. He has nothing to depend on but the scholars' payments, which he estimates to amount to 16 pounds per annum. He also boards with the scholars.

Monellan
  • 10 Protestant males
  • 20 Protestant females
  • 5 Roman Catholic males
  • 3 Roman Catholic females

Total: 38

The teacher of this
school is Anne Jane Bdwards, a Protestant. She teaches reading, sewing and knitting. The scholars get their education free, as the school is supported and patronised by the Revd Mr Delap <Delop> and his sisters the Misses Delaps. The tutor's salary by the year is 5 pounds.

Ballinacor
  • 34 Roman Catholic males
  • 23 Roman Catholic females

Total: 57

The teacher's name is Dennis McBrerty, a Roman Catholic. He is supported by the scholars; he estimates his school to be worth, on the average, 12 pounds per annum. He also boards with the scholars he goes to each scholar day about.

Gleneely
  • 23 Roman Catholic males
  • 11 Roman Catholic females

Total: 34

The teacher's name is Alexander Craig. He is a Roman Catholic and is supported by the scholars; he estimates his school to be worth on the average 6 pounds per annum. He also boards with the scholars he goes to each scholar day about.

Trusk
  • 28 Roman Catholic males
  • 17 Roman Catholic females

Total: 45

The teacher's name is Patrick Murley, a Roman Catholic. He is supported by the scholars; he values his school to be worth 10 pounds per annum. He does not board with the scholars.

Goland
  • 3 Protestant males
  • 2 Protestant females
  • 12 Roman Catholic males
  • 8 Roman Catholic females

Total: 25

The teacher's name is James McGowan. He is a Roman Catholic and is supported by the scholars. He teaches reading, writing and arithmetic. He charges for each quarter of a year for reading 2s, writing 2s 6d, arithmetic 3s; he estimates his school to be worth in the average 10 pounds per annum.

Carrickmagra
  • 25 Protestant males
  • 16 Protestant females
  • 11 Presbyterian males
  • 4 Presbyterian females
  • 7 Roman Catholics males
  • 1 Roman Catholic female

Total: 64

The teacher's name is William Johnston; he is a Protestant. He receives 8 pounds per annum, also 1 acre of land and a house rent free from the Revd Robert Delap of Monellan, curate of the parish of Donaghmore. He also charges 1 d per week from each scholar, which he estimates to be worth on the average 8 pounds per annum. He teaches reading, writing and arithmetic. He makes no difference in his charges for teaching any of the above branches. This schoolhouse was built at the expense of the above-mentioned clergyman in the year 1831; it cost 140 pounds.

Gortnamuck
  • 3 Protestant males
  • 2 Protestant females
  • 4 Presbyterian males
  • 3 Presbyterian females
  • 14 Roman Catholic males
  • 14 Roman Catholic females

Total: 40

The teacher's name is William Gallagher; he is a Roman Catholic and is supported by the scholars. He averages his salary to 16 pounds per annum. He teaches writing and reading; he charges 2s 6d per quarter of a year for the former and 2s for the latter.

Drummurphy
  • 4 Protestant females
  • 10 Presbyterian males
  • 12 Presbyterian females
  • 2 Roman Catholic males
  • 2 Roman Catholic females

Total: 30

The teacher's name is Francis McClure, a Protestant. This school formerly was supported by the Kildare Street Society but at present it is not. The only advantage the teacher has is a house rent free and all the books etc. for instruction. He estimates his salary on the average to 14 pounds per annum. This schoolhouse was built at the expense of Sir Robert Ferguson.

Drummurphy This school is taught by Mary Walker, a Presbyterian. She has nothing to depend upon but the children's payments, which are about 10 pounds per annum. She charges from 1s to 1s 6d per quarter. She teaches the females to sew. This school was under the Kildare Street Society, but since the government grant was withdrawn from it she receives no salary from the society.
Dreenan
  • 11 Protestant males
  • 9 Presbyterian males
  • 1 Presbyterian female
  • 45 Roman Catholic males
  • 22 Roman Catholic females

Total: 88

This school is kept in part of a dwelling. The teacher's name is Patrick Brisland. He has no other remuneration than what he receives from the scholars, which is about 2s per quarter from each; his yearly income averages about 13 pounds.

Castlefin
  • 5 Protestant males
  • 1 Protestant female
  • 16 Presbyterian males
  • 6 Presbyterian females
  • 26 Roman Catholic males
  • 20 Roman Catholic females

Total: 74

This school is kept in a house of Dr Rogan's, which he gives to the teacher gratis to keep his scholars in. His name is Mr Hanagan; he has no other remuneration but what he gets from the scholars, which is from 2s 6d to 7d 6d per quarter from each. He teaches mathematics, book-keeping; he makes about 25 pounds per annum; he is a Roman Catholic.

Castlefin
  • 5 Roman Catholic males

Total: 5

The teacher's name is Mr Dogherty, a Roman Catholic. He teaches in another person's house. He has no other remuneration but what he gets from the scholars, which is 15s per quarter from each; his yearly income averages from 24 pounds to 30 pounds.

Upper Raws
  • 3 Protestant males
  • 2 Protestant females
  • 12 Presbyterian males
  • 14 Presbyterian females
  • 4 Roman Catholic males
  • 4 Roman Catholic females

Total: 39

The teacher's name is William McClean; he is a Presbyterian and is supported by the scholars. He boards with the scholars and estimates the value of his school to be 9 pounds 15s per annum.

Grahamsland
  • 46 Protestant females
  • 40 Presbyterian females
  • 23 Roman Catholic females

Total: 109

This school is taught by Mrs Mary Mahaffey; she is a Protestant. She teaches reading, writing, sewing and knitting, and receives 12 pounds per annum from the London Ladies' Hibernian Society and is allowed quarterly premiums according to the number and proficiency of the pupils. She is also allowed to take from each pupil 1d per week from those that consider themselves able to pay it. This school is also supplied with books etc. from the society.

Grahamsland
  • 24 Protestant males
  • 7 Protestant females
  • 4 Presbyterian males
  • 3 Presbyterian females
  • 3 Roman Catholic males
  • 3 Roman Catholic females

Total: 44

The teacher's name is Robert Steele, a Protestant; he receives from the Kildare Street Society a house rent free, also books of instruction and 1 acre of land. He estimates the salary he gets yearly from the scholars to be worth on the average 7 pounds l0s 6d; he gets no money from the society.

Meenlaugher
  • 4 Protestant males
  • 3 Protestant females
  • 7 Presbyterian males
  • 6 Presbyterian females
  • 12 Roman Catholic males
  • 14 Roman Catholic females

Total: 46

The teacher's name is Hugh O'Donnell, a Roman Catholic; he is supported by the scholars. He does not board with the scholars; he estimates his salary to be on the average 12 pounds per annum.

Correfrin
  • 3 Protestant males
  • 1 Protestant female
  • 4 Presbyterian males
  • 17 Roman Catholic males
  • 6 Roman Catholic females

Total: 31

The teacher's name is Patrick Boyle; he is a Roman Catholic. He is not supported by any society but by the scholars. He estimates his salary to be worth on the average 10 pounds per annum; be also boards with the scholars.

Killygordon
  • 7 Protestant males
  • 10 Protestant females
  • 7 Presbyterian males
  • 39 Presbyterian females
  • 16 Roman Catholic males
  • 29 Roman Catholic females

Total: 108

This school is taught by Margaret Sterriot; she is a Seceder. She receives the sum of 13 pounds per annum from the Hibernian Society and about 2 pounds from the children, in all about 15 pounds per annum. The children learn to read, write and arithmetic The females learn to sew. There were 2 schools taught in this schoolhouse till within a few months ago, and as soon as they can get a suitable master will be continued.

Dooghan
  • 2 Protestant males
  • 4 Protestant females
  • 6 Presbyterian males
  • 7 Presbyterian females
  • 9 Roman Catholic males
  • 7 Roman Catholic females

Total: 35

The teacher's name is John McKenny, a Roman Catholic; he is supported by the scholars. He values his school to be worth 9 pounds per annum; he boards with the scholars.

Upper Cavan
  • 1 Presbyterian male
  • 29 Roman Catholic males
  • 5 Roman Catholic females

Total: 34

The teacher's name is James Braceland, a Roman Catholic; he is supported by the scholars. He estimates his school to be worth on the average 12 pounds per annum; he also boards with the scholars.

Lower Cavan
  • 33 Protestant males
  • 71 Protestant females
  • 8 Presbyterian males
  • 6 Presbyterian females
  • 3 Roman Catholic males
  • 4 Roman Catholic females

Total: 125

The teacher's name is George Campbell, a Protestant; he is to receive a salary from the London Hibernian Society but he cannot say how much, as he is not more than one quarter teaching in this school. He receives from the scholars the sum of 6 pounds Ss per quarter. He charges from Is to 2s per quarter those learning to read and write 1s and those learning arithmetic 2s.


(Signed: I.I. Wilkinson, Lieutenant Royal Engineers, 18th April 1836)

 

Back To Top

© Finn Valley Web Design 2002